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Overqualified?

Overqualified?

John Rossheim, Monster Senior Contributing Writer

Make a Virtue of Your Extra Qualifications

In the interview, if your prospective employer says that your extraordinary qualifications cast doubt on your candidacy, recast your past as an asset to your future at the company. Emphasize that “you’re getting somebody with the potential to move up,” says Frances Haynes, coauthor with Daniel Porot of 101 Toughest Interview Questions.


Draw Out Objections; Don’t Volunteer Them

Employers typically have the following objections to candidates with extra qualifications: You’ll get bored quickly; you won’t be satisfied with the salary; you’ll jump to another company as soon as you get a better offer. “Employers are pretty reticent to hire overqualified people, because they believe when the economy picks up, they’ll lose those people,” says Haynes.

If you raise these issues early in the application process, you risk short-circuiting your candidacy. Instead, see what’s on the minds of your interviewers by asking open-ended questions such as these: “What else do you need to hear to be convinced that I’m the best fit for the job? Do you have any questions about my candidacy that I haven’t yet had the chance to answer?” Just make sure you’ve already ferreted out all the tough questions that your work history could possibly raise – and practiced answering them.

The Ultimate Issue

Finally, be prepared to answer one question that the interviewer may be too embarrassed to ask: Won’t it be humiliating for you to take a job that many people would consider beneath you? You can address this issue indirectly through the positive attitude you convey in everything you say about the available position and your fitness for it. “You have to be perceived as the kind of person who believes there is honor in every job,” says Haynes.

Related Reads:
One Resume Mistake Can Cost You the Job
15 Toughest Interview Questions (and Answers!)